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Weekly Round-up - Land restoration in China, how advocacy should be funded, football as a peace building tool in Colombia & more!

Published Date: 24 October 2017

Weekly Round-up- Land restoration in China, how should advocacy should be funded, football as a peace building tool in Colombia & more.


Each week, the SIX team will be sharing their favourite pieces of reading. The content will be organised thematically, and each piece will tie to work that is currently being undertaken by the organisation. Enjoy!




Funding


Julie Munk: What does advocacy look like in the current moment, and how should It be funded?


What does effective organising in the current era look like? And how can funder respond appropriately? (via Philanthropy News Digest, July 2017)


Poverty


Duncan Collins-Adams: The lie that poverty is a moral failing was buried a century ago. Now it’s back


Fintan O’Toole reflects on George Bernard Shaw’s interpretation of poverty and the relevance it continues to have in the 21st Century. (via The Irish Times, October 2017)


Land Restoration


Jordan Junge: China's Greening of the Vast Kubuqi Desert is a model for land restoration projects everywhere


A privately driven effort that benefits the community and environment that could be used for other degraded land (via Time, July 2017)


Russia & the US Election


Marc Violo: Inside Russia’s social media war on America


For many of us, Russian hacking remains a story about the 2016 American election. But there is another story taking shape. Marrying a hundred years of expertise in influence operations to the new world of social media, Russia may finally have gained the ability it long sought but never fully achieved in the Cold War: to alter the course of events in the U.S. by manipulating public opinion. (via Time, May 2017)  


Colombian peace process


Duncan Collins-Adams: Colombia’s Farc guerillas turn to football as route back into society


Now the guns are finally silenced after 53 years of conflict in Colombia, the Marxist Farc, formerly one of the most powerful and feared groups in the world, want to have a professional team. (via The Guardian, October 2017)